Thursday, August 15, 2013

Politics...such a dirty word



During last weekend’s  visit to my family’s house, we broached the subject of politics during lunch (a mortal sin). I am the only one of my particular political persuasion in my family, so as you can imagine I am vastly outnumbered. I tend to be very vocal (albeit respectfully vocal) about my beliefs so things can sometimes be…animated.

I know when the subject of politics comes up that I should just keep things to myself to avoid a debate breaking out at dinner time but I just can’t help myself! I have to be the voice of reason :)

Why do politics arouse such an emotional response from us?  Do your family get-togethers ever devolve into a political debate?

138 comments:

  1. I think it evokes such strong feelings because it comes down to our beliefs and values, things we hold dearly. And we fight for what we believe in.
    My cousin is the only liberal one in our family. Yes, it makes family gatherings interesting. He likes to argue though, so that just makes it worse for him.

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  2. Oh, I hear you! I'm in a similar situation... and don't get me started on the religious debates that have rocked our family -with people even denying evolution...

    Some topics really are best left alone.

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  3. Hahaha! Everyone thinks they're the voice of reason - probably the reason it can become so heated.

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  4. i think it like religeon is one of those bastions...and often we have historical and family ties that we dont even understand...like alex says it attacks our beliefs and values...i def love to have conversations about it as i dont think i have all the answers and it opens my mind a bit....

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  5. Ooh sounds like a lively lunch...as a family we don't talk politics, after all, there's so many other things we could fall out about :) friends do though and I like to hear their arguments before I make up my mind. I always feel I don't quite know enough.

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  6. I tend to avoid getting into political debates as much as I can but I do feel strongly about politics. I think it's something everyone needs to be passionate about and feel strongly about. These people run your country and effectively control your lives.

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  7. Interesting lunch, Sometime our family do argue about politic, but when I'm with my friends... its totally different we do have different views and its kinda fun.. but I'll rather listen than talk.:)

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  8. My family doesn't do get-togethers, so I'll never know. I don't understand politics anyway.

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  9. Politics and religion are a crock. That is my answer to both of them and that is that when someone tries to argue with me. As they are all a bunch of liars, theives and two bit douche bags no matter the side, so we waste time arguing over the idiots.

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  10. Politics or any other subject, everyone always thinks they have the right opinion! LOL!!! Me and my brother are very democrat ... but we are smart enough NEVER to have discussions in front of the family about it! LOL!! :)

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  11. You're right, politics generate a great amount of emotion, don't they? We don't get into it much at family gatherings, but then, we are mostly on the same page anyway. I've always thought the phrase "Agree to disagree" was fitting when it came to politics. Usually you do not convince one side or the other to change their mind.

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  12. My family can discuss politics just fine. But I generally steer clear with other people as it can create too much animosity. I don't think political discussions change anyone's mind anyway, so why raise everyone's blood pressure. Everyone KNOWS they are right. LOL.

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  13. haha yes politics come up in my immediate family--but i try and stay out of the discussions---i used to be very political, but now although i am up on what is going on--i find i am much less opinionated about it :)

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  14. I just know there are some subjects that are not to be discussed between my sister and me. We are rather complete opposites where religion and politics are concerned. I am very broad-minded, and she has admitted she is very narrow-minded. Nonetheless, we seem to never run out of conversation, even staying away from religion and politics. I remember (when I was a child) times my father and his three brothers would somehow wind up in a rather strong discussion of this type. Seems that my dad was the lone one out then. I though it a waste of energy and relationships to involve oneself in such disagreements.

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  15. I do not talk politics with my husband's family. Me being raised in Oregon, and them never having traveled out of Kentucky... I think you can guess which way both of our political beliefs go. Therefore, I never discuss it. I just shake my head and walk away when they start talking politics.

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  16. I lose "followers" and often get dismissed because of my politics but it is so much a part of me. I am a political being. A lot of it does not come down to reason but how we were raised. If we were Eskimos we would love to eat Seal Eyeballs! Basically if you are not a reader and open to investigation it is all emotion.

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  17. I've learned to stay quiet because I'm odd man out. I also usually get first dibs on dessert that way too while they are focused on political issues. Pie is much more appetizing.

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  18. I usually keep my opinions to myself on the subjects of politics and religion. Sometimes, I don't feel like I can have a discussion about it without it turning into an argument or a debate. Other times, I don't feel as well informed as I'd like to on a subject before jumping into a conversation about it. Although, that doesn't stop some people. :)

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  19. Hahaha
    That can bring on some heated arguments. But in truth, it really doesn't make any difference who is in charge of the government. Many years ago it used to make somewhat of a difference. But now, that the big agenda is here, it's all the same.

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    1. Truer words have never been spoken.
      Except, "That Penwasser is a real smart ass, you know."

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  20. Yes! We have both in our family to. My husband's family is deeply southern baptists that are republican. My family is mostly independent with a few republican's and a handful of democrats.

    As much as I'd like to believe in a party or person, it's hard. So many people turn corrupt. John Edwards is a perfect example. My goodness that guy tried turning on his southern charm. I'm not saying I really liked him. He just seemed gentleman like for a while. In the end of his political endeavors he just ended up being a total shmuck.

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  21. My family tends to get carried away in political discussions.

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  22. We are so split in parts of my family on politics that we just don't talk about them at all when we're together. I see their Facebook stuff, though, so I feel like we've already had those heated discussions in person when I do see them.

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  23. I never get in talks about my family about it, but there's a few guys at work who are not just republicans but so right-wing there's not much room on the far-right to move to.

    There was one guy who was asked who'd win the pres. election last year and with confidence he said "Romney in a landslide". Needless to say, he was really upset the day after election day.

    A bit of a sore loser too. He thought just because Obama had a 2nd term that we'd go straight into the Great Depression Part 2. Where people would resort to drastic measures like eating domesticated animals for food.

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    1. So THAT'S why my dog got all nervous in late November.

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  24. They are both man made and extremely flawed.
    JB

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  25. Fortunately in our house, family even, we all hate David Cameron (I'll spare your readers the terms and names we use for him!). I don't want Scotland to gain independence, however, so will vote against it!

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    1. NOTE: I'm an American, so please excuse me.
      Scotland wants independence? Where are they gonna go?
      Are they still holding a grudge over that whole William Wallace thing?

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  26. I love talking politics! And I feel you, everyone in my family is on the opposite political team than me. I can hold my own though, lol.

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  27. I am not big on conflict so I tend to stay away from politics but my Dad gets super passionate and you can't calm him down. He is a socialist and so is my Mom. They believe that those with more should have to spread the wealth to those with little. It is interesting to hear their views because I live in the most conservative province in Canada where rich want to get richer. It is crazy!!

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  28. Our family get-togethers rarely devolve into something like that. The only time that I recall was several years ago. It got quite heated. The weirdest thing is that (and I have no clue how this happened) we all believe the same things. So, everyone was yelling at each other. AGREEING with each other. Weird.
    My very best friend is 180 degrees out from me, politically speaking. We just NEVER get into political discussions. It's worked for 48 years (except the one time we debated Nixon-McGovern...in 1972!!).

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  29. i like the debate, why is that we are taught to not talk about these kinds of things? it's how we learn and understand and grow.

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  30. I think it's because the politicians have control over how we live-telling us pretty much what to eat, etc. and meanwhile they can do what ever they want. It really does not matter any more if they are Republicans or Democrats- they all are pretty awful these days.
    They really do get my knickers in a twist these days.

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  31. Thankfully, my family members and I all pretty much agree on politics in general even if we disagree on some issues in particular. My daughter-in-law, however, deals with this a lot. Politically and spiritually, she has grown away from her family and they blame my son/me/our family although sometimes they actually allow that maybe she is an independent young woman capable of thinking for herself. I guess it's easier to think she's brainwashed now than to imagine that she felt they were trying to brainwash her before. The funny thing is, until my children started voting, I wouldn't talk about politics with them. I wanted them to look at the issues for themselves and come to their own conclusions. You can imagine my sigh of relief when they told me how they voted for the first time I and I could still hold my head high while patting myself on the back for a job well done, giving them the trust and respect they deserved to vote their conscience.

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  32. My family are all of the same party so we don't have that problem. Politics is something else though, so I won't get into it here.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  33. We have family dinners every Tuesday and pretty much avoid politics and religion at the request of our hostess my DIL's 90 year old grandmother. Grandma who says she's a Republican because her father was one. But she voted for the Dems the last two presidential elections. Made me think as my grandma was a Democratic Chair in her district in her day and all of my family votes mostly Democratic. In my house we have lively discussions even though we all are pretty much of the same cut when in comes to the particulars. My family just likes discussion, and can get pretty overwrought not with each other though. We pretty much agree we need a whole new congress.

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  34. I do not enjoy talking about politics, it really does make people so emotional and say things they would never say on another subject. I guess it's the views and beliefs from the different parties that people feel strongly about. I so wish conversations could be more civil, both at home and with the politicians!

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  35. Wow, politics and religion. The mere mention of either subject could lead to WAR. Fortunately, most of my relatives are of the same political persuasion. However, most of my friends are not.

    You are very courageous to stand up for your beliefs when you're outnumbered!

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  36. I think our political tendencies are influenced so heavily by our own values that it's hard to hear "I disagree with your political views" without hearing "I am judging you as a person." It's definitely a trigger for emotive discussion!

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  37. I used to get A plus plus in college in Political Science. Today I think it is a waste of time to discuss it. My husband how ever loves to discuss it. He has never studied Political Science but puts tremendous amount of energy in discussing it any way.

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  38. We avoid discussions about politics and religion.

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  39. Nope! We don't dare broach the subject. With friends either...we are a minority so it just means insults and trouble for us.

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  40. I know, right? Politics=Pandora's box. Yup. I think it's because your political view is so close to your own values and opinions that to challenge them is to strike at the heart of what makes you you. At least, that's how I feel about my political views.

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  41. I don't fit in any square. I'm a free thinker and, believe it or not, this has led to the loss of friends, and one of my sisters doesn't even talk to me. My parents are open-minded like me in terms of politics. We discuss politics openly and we enjoy our conversations.
    Free thinkers are lonely people, though. My favorite poet, Julia De Burgos said it:
    "My soul: it lives in the silence of the free thinker who lives alone..."

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  42. Well for one thing, I think politics and religion should never merge, the church should be kept separate. the church belongs to God, not government. This can be hard with certain issues, but all kinds of friction and fights can break out otherwise. I have resolved to keep my mouth shut around a lot of people, because if not, it gets too emotional and argumentative.

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  43. You are right politics is a can of worms, best avoided!

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  44. soo understandable! I work in politics, it can get crazy!!

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  45. Politics are so important but I hate getting involved. There is just so much anger around the subject!

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  46. What a good question... I wonder *why* people get so heated and emotional about the whole thing... it's not as if we get so heated if we prefer different types of music or food... opinions always need to respected, even if we disagree.

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  47. Since my family is like yours and I am the lone liberal voice, we avoid politics like the plague. They have finally learned that yelling will not make me switch parties.

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  48. I do not share my political opinions or choice with friends and especially family....people are just overly vehement about their political beliefs these days. Once you get them started they will not hush up :)

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  49. I don't really know the answer, but my guess is, like religion, politics gets to our core beliefs. And we don't like to have those challenged.

    I love the questions you pose. They make me think for a little while :)

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  50. I don't get politics at all - and certainly wouldn't argue about it - because there can be no winner on the subject, everyone's ideals are different.

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  51. I think its great that you do that. Sometimes my Dad gets very agitated about me and my sisters' views but history has shown that he does listen and tries to change things. He did a speech one day about allowing women priests in the Catholic Church after we told him how ridiculous it all was...

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  52. Most of our family follows the same political path. We don't invite the ones that don't! HA HA! Just kidding! I love having a good political debate. Especially with my young son. Love to hear why they vote the way they do. It can get heated, but that's all part of a good debate. :)

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  53. Oh, we always get into a spirited 'debate'. My brother is extreme RIGHT and I am extreme LEFT, and everyone else falls in between...its fun for us to push each other's buttons about politics. Religion, on the other hand, we leave alone. My grandpa rules the roost on that topic and no one wants to give him a stroke...he gets pretty agitated LOL.

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  54. I am not political at all but I happened to mention something on my blog that my daughter read. She has not talked to me since election day because she didn't agree with me. Sad isn't it!?

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  55. Politics are a huge no-no at my family gatherings. I come from a very conservative Republican family and am a liberal Democrat. The ONLY one in my family. Family gatherings can get very heated if someone goes into an Obama rant in front of me. My partner's family is a mix and they all are good natured with each other. This is sooo much easier on the nerves.

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  56. Boo! I hate what politics does to people. It doesn't matter what side people are on, it can just become so heated and hateful. It saddens me. Most of my family obsesses over politics. I find it frustrating and unhealthy. There is a lot in the world for all us to be angry or sad about, but you have to remember to carry on and keep your chin up! There is also a lot of good. :) That's why I love the quote, "Be the change that you want to see in the world." I hope you learned your lesson at dinner. hahahaha ;)

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  57. Now I'm curious about your politics. :)

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  58. Ha ha...I stay away...why indeed? We are all know-it-alls, including the politicians and most of us cannot handle simple tasks..too funny...sorry you fell into the trap.

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  59. Our differences in politics has thrown quite a few wedges in my relationship with my oldest daughter... it is odd as she grew up with me, believed what I did and once she went off and married Paul (who by the way is amazing - except for the political aspect) she believed what he did.. Now I cannot even broach the subject without being cut out of her life for months at a time... So I don't....

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  60. My immediate family is all pretty much on the same page, but even if we weren't, I think we'd remember that love trumps politics : ) and have you read George Sander's graduation address to the seniors of Syracuse U? It's all about kindness, I highly recommend it.

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  61. There are people in my family who have ceased speaking because of politics. I think that's silly and ridiculous and pointless.

    No one is going to be able to convince anyone else of their position, and why screw up familial relations because of it?

    No matter how strong I feel about something, if it's family, I can generally shrug and say, "I don't like any of those politicians!"

    There are probably exceptions to that rule, but I'm feeling conciliatory at the moment.

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  62. I love political debate!
    (I think my brother-in-laws opinions are stupid - but he probably thinks mine are too!)
    (Otherwise - family debates on politics are pretty sensible!)
    Anna :o]

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  63. It often boils down to social justice yet when people are questioned, the difference is often very little.

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  64. Oh, I can't talk politics with my family--it just evolves into arguments. :-) I, too, am the only one of my "family of origin" who thinks like I do. They are conservative, and I live in a very conservative part of Virginia. Let's just say I'm not so conservative in my political views.

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  65. I would have to say no. We all mostly vote the same way and there are so many other things we talk about that it doesn't come up.

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  66. I'm usually the last word in my home: "Who am I to criticize what gets peoples' heads together and makes them feel like they're winning or, even more fun, like they're losing?" Works for religion, politics and child-rearing. All my relatives just shut up because my eyes go all roundy --my kids just laugh. Life is good!

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  67. It used to be possible to have civil political discussions, and even if a person wasn't a fan of whoever was in the White House, the conversation was mostly respectful. Not any more, so I mostly try to avoid political discussions. Arguing politics is as pointless as trying to blow out a light bulb.

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  68. Sometimes we debate about politics. And even religion. Two topics that can get people really worked up. But when it comes to my brother, we share a similarity when it comes to politics: cynicism... :)

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  69. O goodness, don't get my family started. And yes, like Martha, religion is another of "those" topics! I try to stay out of these things lol

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  70. Well, given you were the only one, of course you had to defend your party's views. When my family gets together, we don't talk politics. We're mostly on the same page, though. Religion is the hotter topic, since we're inter-faith. When relatives thank Jesus, I loudly declare my appreciation for Moses. It makes for a fun tension.

    xoRobyn

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  71. They do, they do! With my other and his wife, they live in France. I think the ideology of the Euro is toxic and the resultant unemployment in some Euro zone countries is criminal whereas they believe those countries are responsible. Best avoided!

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  72. I try to avoid politics as much as possible. My sister and I have similar beliefs, so that's okay, but other family members seem to just absorb the opinions written in the papers. At work, I walk away from discussions on politics and religion.

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  73. Religion and politics, definitely two to still steer clear of, especially when a good meal is on the table. A time to relax and smile, not argue. And arguments will follow, that's for sure. ;>(

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  74. Most of my family and I agree on most political things. It's other things that we disagree on. I have vastly differing opinions on things like organ donation, blood donation and such things. Most of my family are for it..I am not. My family got really mad at me when I went in for surgery and refused to sign the paper to accept a blood transfusion if I needed it. But I stand by my beliefs.

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  75. My husband and I disagree on politics somewhat, and I can't even say certain words w/o getting him started. I've learned over the years to be very quiet at times. It doesn't change my beliefs at all, but it does make for peace in the home. ;)

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  76. Please don't stop voicing your reasoning, Keith! I'm with you all the way.
    (We'll get through to them one of these days!) ;)

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  77. Ah! I avoid politics and religion arguments when possible. I have my convictions but I am not one to argue. I am not a leader rather a follower :/ By the way I am your newest follower...greetings!

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  78. My immediate family is very conservative, but we do have our share of liberals in the greater family. I avoid polital discussions. It is mostly a no-win conversation, with no one changing their stance, so why argue? Not me...

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  79. Golden rule of family meetings: never discuss politics and sex. Especially when they go hand in hand together! :-)

    Like you, I arise strong feelings amongst family members back in Cuba when I make my political views known. But, I guess that goes with the territory.

    Greetings from London.

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  80. Oh boy. Just reading this hit a nerve in me Keith. My husband and I have learned not to talk about politics if we want to keep the peace. It's the us v. them mentality that bothers me, when did we stop being "we" as a country?

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  81. I the only one to speak about politics at home... really politic is not dirty but some politicians are.

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  82. I think it's pretty easy to get distracted that above all it's about being united if we want to stand. I don't think I actually agree with you politically (just a guess) but beyond that and more importantly I consider you my fellow countryman and friend and to me that keeps me focused. Disagreement doesn't have to divide us in fact it can make us better people.

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  83. my friends and I do not discuss politics at social gatherings...my husband and I agree on most things - big sigh there!

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  84. I always try to avoid the debate about politics at home because it turns in to a big argument :)

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  85. I make it a point to only discuss political issues with friends whom I know are able to stay CALM during the discussions. I am one of the rare few, I suppose, who is able to discuss religion and politics without getting into a fight.

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  86. Oh yeah, there are some heated debates in my family. My dad is a pastor and I have some different views from him. But I've learned to agree to disagree on certain things and just leave it alone. In my experience it's usually best to just avoid the subject altogether!

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  87. Being the lone voice must be extremely difficult. My own family tends to be pretty similar, so as loud as we are at Thanksgiving, we're generally on the same page. Even those registered to different parties seem to hold similar views. I am grateful they overlap with my own.

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  88. I think that Canadians are less likely to argue about politics...but I could be wrong. ;) I'm like you, I say what I want, especially if I think my opinion will encourage someone to be kinder to people/animals. :)

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  89. I think there might be an answer to your first question in your last sentence about being the voice of reason. We think our own opinions are most reasonable and that the opposing opinion is not. And nobody, conservative or liberal, likes to be told that their view is "wrong" lol.

    Our family get-togethers don't tend to get into political debates...sometimes a minor discussion, but not so much a debate.





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  90. I think it all comes down to opinions, in that we want to believe that which we believe in is the correct option. As for me, I try not to get ensnared in debates of any manner at get togethers. In terms of politics, it's pointless here, as it would literally be me against everyone else, as my views don't fall into line with either party, in fact, I don't believe in the party based system at all, I'm an issue based voter and that, to the diehards in my family, on either side of the fence, just doesn't make sense and I used to try to get them seeing things my way, but, I eventually realized that it was futile and only led to raising of the voices all around and therefore I've stayed away from that type of conversation ever since.

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  91. Hi Keith,

    I don't normally discuss politics. Yet, over the last three years, my anger towards the most evil British government I've ever known, flamed the passions of anger, of knowing that a change is needed. I even recently posted a political blog. Very much out of character.

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  92. My family doesn't discuss politics much. I consider myself to be an independent. I also do not discuss much of the subject as well as religion. An opinion is like an asshole - everyone has one and that is normally where I live it all. I don't become offended but I become annoyed. Maybe that is the same thing? Ha.

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  93. We never discuss politics with family. Maybe something will be said from time to time in passing, but never a heated debate. We avoid some topics to keep things civil, otherwise, a family full of hotheads can get ugly very quickly with such discussions.

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  94. Ugh...this has been on my mind a lot lately. I shy away from discussing or posting on it most of the time, but sometimes I can't refrain. It's definitely a touchy subject and like you, I'm the only one who is "of a particular political persuasion." Good luck to you, my friend. lol I can relate.

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  95. Hi Keith .. can completely understand ... always steer clear of religion and politics. Diplomats are pretty smart (sometimes) ..

    Cheers - always good to never discuss .. Hilary

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  96. Oy! I think the crux of the matter, and maybe someone has said this up top, is the "I'm right" and you're either a) wrong or b) on my side, so we validate each other. Respectful dialogue is fine but when one person goes on a long-winded tear, it's such a bore:()

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  97. This used to happen all the time at my house, and I think it's mainly because it can evoke so many emotions in people and can get quite heated very quickly! I'm glad you liked the lemur photos, I am also hoping to be able to travel to Madagascar to see them someday! - Tasha xxx

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  98. Hi Keith, Oh no, my family and I do not discuss politics, nor religion when we are together. Lol, you can say we learned the hard way.

    Madison:-)

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  99. No, my family get togethers go smoothly in that department because we are all a bunch of bleeding heart liberals. I am very much like you though, but I do my arguing on the internet.

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  100. My husband gets really riled when talking about politics - so I don't! lol

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  101. Even though we are politically charged, we don't talk politics at family get togethers. Current political strategies have put us at odds with each other and created bitterness. There's a huge problem with the country when a major political figure vows to do everything to make the president of the opposite party a failure when he first takes office. United we stand, divided we fall.

    http://joycelansky.blogspot.com

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  102. Hi, Optimistic, just a quick note to thank you for your kind comment on my blog (Victorian Scribbles) and also to thank you fo following it. I'll be posting again this coming week. Have a good week-end.

    As for politics, my godfamily and we are on the same wave-length, but I do have family members where some buttons are "hot". We love around these, not because of these. :-)

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  103. Ha, we care a lot about politics at our house because our leaders are determining the direction our country is going. And in the USA it is in many ways not a good direction. All that government snooping, etc.

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  104. Political beliefs are very personal and we often don't get why others don't share ours. Can get uncomfortable at the dinner table.

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  105. That's one way to ensure that one meal time runs into another!

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  106. I think politics is a very broad topic that encompasses a lot of material. Between that and religion, mostly everything controversial is covered.

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  107. There is a clear generational divide in the family I have around me about politics. I use the term "family I have around" because I dont live in the same country as any of my relatives - my family has come courtesy of my wife. I think its a case of picking and choosing what you say and when you say it - somethings need to be challenged, but others can be dissected later!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  108. My parents are very anti any sort of political debate, any sort of disagreement so it's just easiest to keep quiet and not talk about anything contentious

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  109. Like you, I am the only member of my family of my political persuasion. I am definitely the odd man out! So it doesn't get discussed AT ALL. EVER. I can have the discussion as I'm extremely open-minded and willing to listen to different sides. I may not agree but I'm an adult and I can have an open discussion. My parents? FORGET ABOUT IT.

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  110. In our family it is best to agree to disagree. My hubby can get on a real roll and not want to stop.

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  111. Politics make me feel tired, sometimes all in a dinner or lunch go so well .....until someone say something and other isn't agree OMY and really don't think political discussions change how people mind:)

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  112. In Ireland they always say that there are two things you never talk about down the pub: Religion and Politics.

    Smart people those Oirish :)

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  113. i hate talking about politics (and religion) because people with such strong beliefs and convictions can be so difficult in not being flexible at all. obviously, i think i'm right in everything, but i'm not conceited enough to think that there isn't a small possibility of someone else's opinion being more correct. i tend to keep my thoughts to myself though, and certainly won't talk politics with my family, ha! x

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  114. Bush-era politics, the birth of Fox News, these things almost brought my family to full-on fights at one time. We actually had to have rules that we would no longer talk about politics at family gatherings.

    And here we look like such nice people!

    Pearl

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  115. My best friend and I made an agreement that we would no longer talk about politics. We agreed to disagree and left it at that. We used to enjoy discussing politics but then it became to heated. My family is on my side. My hubby's is on the other. So, as hard as it is to not say anything, I stay quiet and just nod and smile when they start trashing "my" party or I walk away.

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  116. We all have different opinions on politics on my side of the family, and we all know how we feel so we don't talk about it anymore. I also rarely see them as they live in other states! We spend our time talking about other things.

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  117. Hi Keith! I come from a loud and outspoken family with regard to politics! And my family covers the political spectrum. However, we all love to get into passionate, political discussions! Living in three different countries really adds to the fun! Have a good week!

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  118. Thanks for reading and following my blog. It means a lot to me:)

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  119. I am so passionate about my politics..but try to never get into a discussion with anyone about it! My dad was the Republican Chairman for our county for many years and even attended the convention for Ronald Reagan...hint...then I took over his role, and now my husband has it...believe it or not...we have made the national news in a previous election as not having one...not one...single democrat in our county!

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  120. I know what you mean Keith. I really don't like talking about politics. I'm not sure which way you lean politically, but I feel like I'm one of the few liberals living in Alabama. I get all the political jokes, and jibes throughout the year, and during election season, it sometime gets almost unbearable.
    R

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  121. I hear you... :)
    No subject is more, shall we say "awkward", in our family, than politics.
    I am able to say (most of the time), that I respect and understand their position...but I cannot agree with it. And MOST of the time...I end up asking for "no politics please"...because it inevitably leads to bad feelings and raised voices...as well as blood pressure... :))
    I know my dad just thinks of me as a liberal nut...:) I could be called much worse...heee...
    Have a great week!!
    - Irina

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  122. My family growing up were al of the same political persuasion, but my husband's family is not. I tend to avoid political discussions because, er, hmmm, nobody can ever win those discussions.

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  123. Politics and religion are regular topics at the dinner table whenever we have a family get together. We are all the same religion, so no arguing there, but politics can get rather heated. My dad is a very black and white thinker, very conservative, and the current state of affairs gets him really heated up. I would say the rest of us are more moderate, and our children (as children often are) lean from moderate conservatism to quite liberal. I've found that I learn things from both sides, and yet both sides have really mean and unsavory behavior in their respective outer fringes. What I find hard to deal with (in anyone) is the complete lack of respect shown for an opinion that may differ from another. I've done my share of getting excited on this or that topic, but everyone is entitled to the way they think without being labeled or called names, or being accused of thinking ridiculous things. I guess people get heated up because politics represent many of their core beliefs, and that makes it personal. We Americans also love our country and want the best for it. So we argue and debate, which is ok. What's not ok is the name calling and labeling.

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  124. I'm not vocal at all because I HATE confrontation. I'll yell from the rafters about human rights and I will speak my case about certain subjects, but I stay away from straight repub vs dem arguments.

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  125. Most of my immediate family has the same political beliefs so it's not an issue in my family, but I tend to avoid political discussions in general. I think each person has their own beliefs and their own focus and I've never heard of anyone whose mind has been changed by a debate.

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  126. We avoid politics pretty much. I see that you are in education too. So many of my commenters are in education.

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  127. ugh, every conversation with my father is a political debate. Neither one of us can seem to help ourselves. You would think we would learn to avoid that topic...

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  128. Your voice of reason can be another's voice of insanity. In my immediate family, I am the only one of voting age that is of a particular political persuasion which makes it difficult for any reasoning to occur. I don't understand how equality could be thought of as a "bad" thing. Luckily, I vote everytime, wheras as they mostly don't vote.

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  129. I feel that way too sometimes... that I need to be the voice of reason! I also understand that others feel that way, too, and that is why I actually like discussing things like politics and, unless personally attacked, usually do not get upset!

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