Wednesday, May 7, 2014

I Believe That Trees Have Souls...


“I hear the wind among the trees
Playing the celestial symphonies;
I see the branches downward bent,
Like keys of some great instrument.”

~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Trees have always fascinated me. I have felt a connection to them ever since childhood. I used to love spending hours upon hours in the woods surrounded by these majestic beings. I used to love climbing them and exploring them. I took a nasty spill out of one when I was 11 years old and that taught me a lesson about climbing them too carelessly :-) 

Whenever I go hiking, which is frequently, I love spending time with the trees. To me they are not  inanimate objects. After all, they are living things. I believe trees have souls. I believe every single tree has a story. I believe they are to be cherished and respected.

When I was a little boy we had a wood-burning stove. One day I accompanied my father and two friends of his as they cut down trees to prepare for winter. I will never forget feeling overwhelmingly sad when I saw the trees being cut down. My father and his friends saw this and thought this was ridiculous.

Ridiculous as it may have been, that is when I realized that I had a deep connection with trees, a connection that I would feel for the rest of my life. If anything, it has only grown stronger with time. When I read about the rapid rate of deforestation in the world, I become incredibly sad. Can you imagine a world without forests? A world without trees?

I read recently that there are some trees in this world that are almost 5,000 years old. Can you believe that?! Just let that sink into your mind for a second, that there are trees in this world right now that were here before the Great Pyramids were built, before Stonehenge was built. 

That's so incredibly amazing to me!

I was raised to always respect my elders, and that's why I believe we should love, listen to, and respect trees.

What is your relationship with trees? 

125 comments:

  1. I grew up in Manhattan so my relationship is limited. I'm only now beginning to learn the different types in my own neighborhood but I love being able to recognize what it is I'm seeing. We have a fruitful fig tree in our back yard and our neighbors actually have a cherry tree. There's something magical about going into my back yard and being able to pick a fruit off a branch and just bite into it. Definitely not a part of my childhood experience.

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  2. I really like your attitude toward trees, Keith. I can't imagine the world without trees either. If I am visiting a big city, surrounded by tall buildings (and no trees) for a while, I miss trees. It really is amazing to think about what some of the oldest trees on earth might have seen!

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  3. Like you, I feel terrible sadness when I see a tree cut down. Even if I don't like the look of the tree, it is an alive and living being and I feel trees have some sort of memory. I never feel the same about small plants, bushes or shrubs.

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  4. I once dated a tree...
    Kidding!
    Trees don't really have a lifespan, because they never die. Something has to kill them. That's really wild when you think about it...

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  5. I always imagine trees as witness of the Time. They stood still and watch years pass by..Oh my I wonder how many secrets they contained within them

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  6. I can not imagine our world without trees, they are the beauty of earth.

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  7. daar kan je uren tussen zitten en alleen maar luisteren en genieten.

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  8. Hubs and I did a geriatric happy dance yesterday when we realized our Maple was not dead after all....it cools our house and shades our lawn chairs...what would we do without it.

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  9. ah i love me some trees....i grew up in the woods....most of it gone now due to corporate expansion....i lived outdoors for a year and cooked everything over a fire...i used the cast off limbs...they are where i retreat to find peace...

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  10. An excellent post Keith! I too believe that trees have souls too. Some have said that when a tree loses its leaves in the fall the tree is actually crying tears. Of course we know the scientific reason that trees lose their leaves.

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  11. Hello Keith:

    In our gardening days we always believed that if Mozart may be considered the highest point in music, so trees are the ultimate form of gardens and gardening.

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  12. We had a giant tree in our yard. I think it was dead for at least a few years before we cut it down. We were afraid it would one day fall on the house. Makes me wonder how hold it was, and how neat it would have been to go back in time to see it not even a sapling

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  13. I believe in that as well Keith. 'Funny idea to hug a tree', no it is not. They love us, and we can try to love them.

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  14. I'm with you all the way on this one Keith - there is a special magic surrounding a tree whether it be an apple tree or a great oak - woods and forests are mystical places.

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  15. I rather cringe inside when a tree must be cut down. Anytime that needs to be done, plans should be made to plant two in place of the one missing.

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  16. yes! the giving tree by Shel Silverstein...I hate seeing trees down or being mistreated :(

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  17. I'm with you Keith, trees are wise. I love to hear the wind move through their branches and listen to their leaves whisper. To me, everything is energy and we all are connected, including beautiful trees. They also make me feel safe and protected, what a gift!! Thanks for helping me remember to appreciate them this morning.

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  18. Used to go back in the woods all the time at my sea and climbed many a tree. can't say I felt for them as I burned them in the stove though lol

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  19. I really learned to respect trees when I was a child and saw the giant redwoods in Northern California. Yes, trees definitely do have souls.

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  20. The other day we were driving around and I just felt this well of love spring up inside me for the trees. I wanted to hug them. Then I turned to my husband and said, 'Guess that's where treehuggers come from.' :)

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  21. Keith, I so agree with you. I think all living things have souls. We saw a 5,000 year old Yew tree in Scotland. It was magnificent. And in Oregon there are very old trees. I hug trees. So what!

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  22. Trees fill me with wonder and satisfy a deep place in my soul.

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  23. Keith, I know how you feel about old trees especially... I had a deep feeling of loss and sadness when the city crew came to cut down a very old pine by the road next to our house. I couldn't help but imagine all the history that happened since this huge tree was planted there as a sapling.

    I love a wood fire and I'm grateful to the trees for giving us this wood to keep us warm just like I'm grateful for the fire that consume the wood to keep us warm in cold winters.

    When we have to cut down a tree that is rotting and causes a danger of falling on the house or the wires, I call them a giving tree...
    I use the leaves in the compost, the twigs and small branches for kindling and nothing goes to waste and I thank the tree for the shade it gave me on hot days, for the shear beauty and the shelter it gave to the birds.

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  24. A subject I know about. The trees are my guide.

    Hubby and I were traveling in the back country in the sierras. We needed to get from one place to another and hubby had his maps and compass. The first day he got lost. The second day I was driving and we were still bent on going from point A to point B. I headed off in the direction the trees told me to go and he's telling me I'm going the wrong way. I kept telling him I'm going the right way and to have a little faith. I drove straight to where he wanted to go the day prior. The trees were my guide.

    When I was little my sister and I would head to the power lines about two miles through the forest from our farm. I never got lost. Went in and came back out in the same spot. The trees were my guide. I always listen to the trees.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  25. i have always loved them, too, from childhood on. marveling at their strength and resilience and beauty. and, yes, i tell them so. :)

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  26. I used to take the time out to enjoy trees, these days I admire them in passing. Pity. I'd love to see the trees out by Cali., we were just talking about that not long ago.

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  27. Oh yes, yes and yes. I care for trees, I nurture them, talk to them, plead with them to continue living when they are ill, I embrace them, tenderly prune them, thank them for the benefits they bring to the earth, and sometimes even read to them. In my neck of the woods, the trees are just beginning to bud and every morning I inspect the new green growth.I am always happy when I hear of another person who is also a lover of trees.

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    1. Same here. Spending time amidst the trees is medicinal for me.

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  28. I find trees super fascinating too!

    I think that stemmed from reading "The Giving Tree." :D
    You can find some massive ones on old plantations here in the south and they are just beautiful. Most of them are as old, if not older than the plantation!

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  29. Without trees, we're pretty much doomed. The Rain Forest alone provides one-third of the planet's oxygen.

    I've seen two ancients ones in Britain (approx 4,000 years old) and a Joshua tree in California that is about the same age. And standing in the middle of a grove, surrounded by the giants of the Redwood Forest, would convert anyone into believing trees are sacred.

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  30. I'm with you, Keith! I believe trees have souls too. Must be my Druid ancestors! Have you read Dr. Suess's "The Lorax?" Here's a favorite quote of mine from the book:
    “I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees.
    I speak for the trees for the trees have no tongues.”
    A world without trees would most likely be a dead world!
    Have a happy day!

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  31. Keith,

    I enjoyed your account of respect for the souls of trees. I am a supporter of respecting trees and nature very much. The seasons are lived in the tree which stands in my front garden. A barometer of time!!!
    Right now, there is hope all around in the healthy green leaves, covering the branches. Summer is approaching, I believe:)

    Eileen

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  32. i love this! i know what you mean---there is something very alive in them isn't it :)

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  33. Trees are magnificent. One of my favorite sounds is the rustling of their leaves in a light breeze.

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  34. I love trees, I love how they stay in one place and offer shelter to other living thngs, but at the same time they're constantly changing with the seasons. Just now our horse chestnut trees are amazingly beautiful as their flowers have just bloomed

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  35. thanks for your comment on my blog by the way, our swifts are a different species (Apus apus) than the chimney swift

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  36. Of course they have souls. :)

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  37. Oh Keith, your post has touched my heart today because TREES are very special to me. They are mysterious and beautiful, and they provide shade for us when we need it the most. I can't believe there are some trees that are almost 5,000 years old, that's amazing! I have one in my town that's 200 years old. What a sweet story about the wood-burning stove. I think this is my favorite post of yours yet, Keith. That's how much trees mean to me. I loved everything you said about the majestic tree, and I think I respect them even more after reading this.

    ~Sheri

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  38. I dated one once...... He was a bit wooden

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  39. I wish trees could talk and share their stories. Could you imagine them sharing 2,000 years of history?

    Deforestation makes me sad, too. I can only hope that this is reversed, and that new trees are planted.

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  40. You are such a caring person. I understand your affinity for trees as I used to read underneath a favorite pecan tree when I was young. Deforestation is a huge issue for me as well. Not good for our planet at all.

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  41. Trees are enormously comfortable for me, sheltering, shading, aged wisdom beyond all. I'm especially attached to forests, especially ther redwoods in California.

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  42. I agree! I have a big book called Amazing Trees Of Virginia, and I am going to nearby places to try and find some. So I have a whole computer folder of the pictures, waiting to post them. And of course let's not forget the horror of the deforestation of the Rainforest, many animals are becoming extinct with it.

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  43. Well, Keith, you don't have to ask me if I feel the same way! I, too, feel the pain when a beautiful old tree is cut down - it actually makes my heart ache. I do feel that trees have a soul and are here to help mankind - a God-given gift which we fail to honor. I know my trees, and love them all. Yes, I am a tree hugger. But I do not judge those who cut trees for a living. I believe that as we evolve, we will understand the true benefit of loving our trees. I like to think positive. xo Karen

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  44. I do love trees, to be out among them makes me happy but I don't quite feel the same as you do. It is a shame to cut down trees that old though.
    We do need to use the wood from trees and many are planted to replace the ones cut down. And NO I can't imagine a world without trees and I don't think we would survive without them.

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  45. A world without trees and we would be dead. That simple.
    "paper or plastic"? I will use my own, thank you. Change
    is also that simple. Can you imagine Heaven without trees?
    Of course not. What they did on Easter Island, we are doing
    now in the Amazon. When will they ever learn?

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  46. Keith, did you know that it is possible for a record player (yes, a phonograph, that old thing) to play on a tree's rings? And that at least one composer has interpreted the sounds as music? As you might expect, each tree has its own song. Check out this article and especially the video: http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/record-play-adapted-play-music-tree-rings.html

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  47. I too think it is incredibly sad how deforestation has happened and how quickly... We should take care of our resources better...
    I also believe that every living thing on this earth should be respected and loved.. instead of destroyed.
    And wow to the trees that are 5000 years old or older... that is amazing :)

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  48. Every tree on earth has a natural lifespan. It would be nice in a perfect world if 'man' allowed trees to live out their natural lives before chopping them down.
    As for imagining a world without trees, there would be no earth without trees.
    We had a very large pocket of temperate climate woodlands(bush) on our property and regarded it a privilege to be its guardian. However, if a large tree (hundreds of feet high) was dying, it would be cut down as to prevent it being easily knocked over in the regular vicious storms and in the process wiping out several younger and healthier trees.

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  49. I love trees, makes me weep to see old growth trees cut down, not that I much like cutting down any of them. They breath life back into our planet, I think there is spirit in all things.

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  50. Trees have always been important to me. They were my safe place. Whenever I felt sad I went into the woods. The forest would calm me, the sun shining through the trees would make me smile no matter how sad or worried I was. And I would talk to the trees, tell them all my sorrows. I've always believed they have a soul, a very caring one at that. I so wish they could tell us their stories! Just thinking of a 5,000 year old tree telling it's story is beyond amazing.
    Deforestation makes me sad and furious. Why would humankind be so stupid? Without them we will not survive on this planet.
    This is a beautiful post, honey. The trees deserve our acknowledgement so much. I can't wait to walk the forests with you again :) <3

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  51. I love trees and I have never been able to make people understand my feelings for them. There needs to be more respect for them. Wonderful post,.

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  52. I've been known to hug a tree or two. ; )

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  53. I admire those old trees with thick rings as they have been with us for many many years ~ I can't think of cutting down trees without thinking that we are destroying the home of other creatures & keeping our environment safe too ~ Where I live in the city, we don't have much trees but I am happy to walk by parks & trails where trees are abundant ~ Hey we are on the same wavelength ~

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  54. Living on the plains, trees are precious to us.

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  55. I love trees. Without them we wouldn't have enough fresh air and much needed shade in the heat.

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  56. Science is also starting to investigate if or how trees communicate one with another. They also think like you that trees have feelings and emotions. Stay tuned to your trees.

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  57. My first poem was about a beloved tree...I love them and have written many poems about them. I think I could honestly say I love them truly. I love the life you have given them here....they like cows are taken for granted.

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  58. I think they do to. At the very least they have a lot of uses

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  59. I grew up in the mountains here in Colorado surrounded by trees. It's sad now because so much of our forests have been hit by the Japanese Pine Beetle which is killing our lodgepole pines at an alarming rate. It's rather disturbing to see entire mountainsides that are brown with dead trees or just empty because they have been clear cut. And I'm a tad disturbed by the idea of the Emerald Ash Borer that is headed our direction as well. I love my trees! They do so much for us!

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  60. I agree with you. I love and respect trees.

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  61. It's perfect timing to read this post, Keith! I just wrote and scheduled a post to go up tomorrow morning about a tree. :) I love trees. I don't feel a connection to them as strong as you described, but I absolutely love them and feel at peace when I'm surrounded by trees (preferably by myself, with a notebook so that I can sit down and write.) I'm always in awe when I think of trees, too. I haven't heard of trees being that old, that's so cool though! I love to think of the stories that trees have. I've always been amazed that if you cut down a tree (although, why would you?) you can see what it's been through by looking at the rings. :)

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  62. I've seen some phenomenal Redwoods here in California. I've also driven through a tree that was carved through to for cars to drive through. It's pretty cool, and I believe it's still thriving. I pretend to know more about trees than I do, though. I worked as a naturalist one summer and pointed out a Redwood to the kids. Later, a counselor took me aside and informed me that there weren't any Redwoods in the region. My response, "But its bark is reddish."

    xoRobyn

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  63. Oops, I meant that it was carved to allow cars to drive through. http://www.northern-california-vacations.com/drive-thru-tree.html

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  64. Coal companies own property that adjoins ours. Several years ago when they harvested timber, we could almost hear the despair from the forest.
    We love trees and only cut them when they are sick or put us in danger.
    R

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  65. Yes, I have always had the same strong connection with trees. I have no idea why or how, as I mostly grew up in the Sonoran desert, but I do. Have you ever read the book Walk Two Moons? It's a Young Adult Fiction book, but I really think you would like it :)

    Fun story: I went to a Bible college for two years in Northern Arizona. The physical campus is located in the Yavapai National Forest, and there are a TON of Ponderosa Pines. The lore I learned (and it bears out in real life!) is that you can go up to the pines and sniff the bark, and you will get in general 3 different scents: chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry, just like milkshakes. It's true. I swear it's true. You get other scents now and again-- watermelon, blueberry, some non-food ones, but typically chocolate or vanilla.

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  66. I am a Californian living in a city that looks like a forest from the air but I have been places where there are no trees. Those landscapes yearn. It is palpable and the souls of future trees wait in infinite patience.

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  67. Always I love trees are something special.
    Here in this area we have trees about 400 years!
    And I love forest I think are the best!
    A beauty post Keith!

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  68. I planted two small maples 6 years ago in a shady corner of my garden. And I always speak to them, call them 'my boys', cutting their branches. Love to touch their trunks--they are warm! I believe they listen to me.

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  69. My relation with trees is the same I have with human beings. Specially since I have my own garden. First I thought they would grow faster - and I thought that about kids too - then that they would be tough and unbeatable - and I thought that about dear husband too - then that they would do the right thing on the right time - and I thought world and elements would be like that too. But I got around by having the trees growing as they please, being hit by plagues etc and deciding to give fruit or not at their whim. See? Just like life and everything else...
    And from time to time I contradict the world and decide to invest on some that everyone is telling me "it won't do" "it will be too long before you see anything of it" (happened with my nut tree: I moved to this home and wanted to plant one but people kept saying - it will take 20 years before you have a decent tree and I didn't. The other day I was in the garden and looked to the sport where I would have it and realized 15 years passed already since that craving... I went out to the garden center and bought my tree and look forward for the next 20 o see it grow..." Yes, they have Souls that are Great to our own.
    Teresa

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  70. What a beautiful post. I can certainly relate to it because I feel the same way. In fact, I feel a connection to all of nature in the same way. Whether I'm hiking through a forest or strolling through a field of wildflowers, I feel a sense of calm and peace. It saddens me when trees are cut down and entire green areas are destroyed to make room for housing or commercial developments.

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  71. Im not sure they have souls, but I am also not sure anything does - what they do have is the ability to allow people to form a connection to the Earth through them.

    But what I like most about them is the way that, with practice, you can read the history of place in its trees - fire, storm and floods are all written into their wood and branches.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    PS: surprised to see a new post - I thought you would have had other, more wonderful, things on you mind!!

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  72. I love trees. There is a huge really old tree in my hometown and I love to go there and visit the tree. :) It always calms me down.

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  73. Like you, Keith, I truly believe that trees have Souls.
    When I am sad, or am facing a perplexing problem, I find a mature Oak tree and sit with my back against it's trunk. Then I close my eyes and tell it all my troubles, in my mind (not out loud, in case anyone passing thinks me mad!!;))
    It's amazing how the solution comes to me in a flash of inspiration.
    I regard trees as wise Guides, as well as true friends! :)

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  74. I love trees! I find solace in them and it is among the trees I refresh my own soul. Our home now has beautiful large trees and I was talking once about how much I loved them, an acquaintance overheard and exclaimed that trees made her nervous. I always wondered what trees had done to her!

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  75. Hubby and I both love trees. We both climbed them as children. I spent many hours sitting up on a large limb with a book in my hand. Great memories. As a land developer, hubby is very careful about tree removal, only removing an absolute minimum for his finished projects...

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  76. One of my earliest "friends" was a tree I learned to climb when I was about eight. Today, my feelings towards trees are equal to my feelings about my land. Deep respect and love.

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  77. To me trees are the force of longevity!

    "Just let that sink into your mind for a second, that there are trees in this world right now that were here before the Great Pyramids were built, before Stonehenge was built"...... Really Amazing!

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  78. They are our elders. Trees have so much wisdom and medicine, we need to listen much more closely. They demonstrate impermanence. They breathe life. And it is not just the deforestation, but the invasive species (insects and diseases) that are affecting our trees. I learned about white pine wilt and white pine weevils this year. And now the woolly adelgid has made its way north into the hemlock forests. When the trees go, the whole ecosystems of a region, even watershed (like the Chesapeake Bay) suffer.

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  79. crazy! something living that long! i wrote a short story about a living tree, fun fantasy full of colors "The Guardian Tree" they really are majestic and magical survivors!

    and thanks for commenting on my cover reveal!

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  80. You would love the organization tentrees, they are based in Canada and are completely invested in our environment. Check out their website tentrees.com for every purchase on their website, they plant 10 trees.
    Great post my friend. I love trees too.
    Cortne

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  81. I, too, love trees. I love looking at the different shapes, the way they are silhouetted against the sky, their presence. I hate to see clear-cutting done. It makes me sick to see trees just wiped out, along with all the habitats for the animals that the trees and surrounding area provided.

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  82. Oh, I agree with you! I believe nature has a soul and so does everything in nature. What a lovely post.

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  83. Ah...I once was feeling depressed and went and sat under a tree in a nearby field. I belong to Kerala and it is all green. The entire world was silent except for the faint whispering of the trees as if sharing my misery and talking to me.
    Tress indeed have soul

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  84. I'm with you all the way, my ideal house would be in a forest among the trees. Can never understand the shortsighted money-loving way people are getting rid of ancient woodland. Not only does it displace ancient peoples and animals habitats, but we can never get it back. The UK government keeps trying to secretly sell off our woodlands. I keep signing the petitions, but it's very worrying.

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  85. Treehugger! ;)
    Just kidding.
    I LOVE trees and it blows my mind to think there are some that over 5,000 years old! I didn't know that.
    I think trees have souls too. If you are quiet enough in the forest you can almost hear/feel them breathing. This post made me want to go be out in a forest right now.

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  86. Yeah, I believe I do respect trees - unlike my son's dog who's always piddling on them!

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  87. they are each a work of art to me.....

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  88. Just read your April 28 post CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!

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  89. Do you know that this post brought tears to my eyes...oh boy. Yes, and a million times yes.
    Indeed they are living, breathing beings....if I keep writing, I'll start crying, so I better just leave it at that! :)

    Dear Keith, thank you so very much for your friendship and support....you left such a kind message regarding the journal...thank you!
    I am catching up with everyone...I'm still blogging, but it seems like I'm always behind.
    Ok, off to read more of your marvelous posts, friend!
    Have a splendid weekend...hug a tree!!! :)
    - Irina

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  90. This is something painful. I felt the same when I witnessed this cut down recently near by my house.
    Deep thought... :(

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  91. Trees do have soul, and they carry a soothing rhythm around them. Love them :-)

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  92. I believe we all have similar thought and feeling for trees in general, but still there are number of trees cut down every day! I wonder why? We are in need of planting more trees now to cut down the pollution that eating every part of our earth. Generally I don’t believe in soul, but I could feel the trees presence and know their worth and wealth.

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  93. I love trees - they are the most beautiful things - a joy to behold.
    It is postulated that the destruction of trees led to the destruction of the civilisation that was Easter Island... How much our existence is reliant on these carbon sequesters and oxygen givers and how little we know it...
    Anna :o]

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  94. Hey Keith,

    Dude, you are probably expecting me to say something like what a treemendous post. But no, I wont say that.

    Ah yes, the rustle of the breeze through the trees. Part of the sweet symphony of nature. I love trees and I was part of "The Tree of Life" collaboration. Indeed, all sorts of trees I fondly hug. Cedar tree? Yes I do.

    Take care and a happy Sunday, your way.

    Gary

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  95. Have you ever read The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein. Powerful little kids' book. Why don't you climb trees anymore? I haven't climbed a tree in years either.

    http://joycelansky.blogspot.com

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  96. Hello Keith.. my hubby and I are both tree lovers and huggers, LOL! Living next to a forest , hubby is battling the foresters that believe it is healthy to cut down trees. I just do not understand their logic.. They should fall naturally..Great post, thanks for sharing.. Happy Sunday!

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  97. All trees have souls and they have been some of my best friends in life. I often feel sorry for people who don't feel/have the same.

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  98. I love trees too and also believe they have souls. When we first moved here, we had bushland in the area behind our house. I came to love two trees that stood directly behind our back fence and I cried the day the bulldozers came and cleared the land for housing development. I wrote a blog post and even dedicated a page in my journal to them...you can see it at the following link if you're interested - http://artbyserena.blogspot.com.au/2010/08/you-will-be-missed.html . I feel devastated when I hear of the forests being destroyed in Malaysia to make way for palm oil plantations. My heart cries for the trees and the animals, such as orangutans, who have lost their homes. When will humankind learn that they can't continue to destroy this planet like they are doing? :'(

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  99. I love trees. They are good company for us. I used to spend most of the time with the plants in my house. I used to speak to them. I have heard people saying plants can understand what we speak to them and they like it alos.

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  100. Oh my goodness I too have had a deep love and fascination for trees and there beautiful energy vibrations since I was a wee child. Still even as I walk or travel I will be instantly attracted to the beauty and feeling various tree embark on me.
    I wouldn't allow to cut any f the tree when we moved to the farm as they are all gorgeous and stately and full of wisdom. Just being near them, sitting under them , seeing all the activity of birds that find havens there as well ...I should stop now as I can go on and on.
    My friends and family have now gotten use to me gushing over the beauty of trees or stopping randomly to take in their beauty .

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  101. You would hate me because we cut down 2 trees when we moved into our home. No worries...we planted 6. We just didn't want big trees in our front yard. We don't mind big ones in our back yard though. I love the bark on some trees. Then how they change every season is cool to.

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  102. Ah ... in love with this post ... and, indeed, very fascinating to have such trees ... imagine what they must have seen, endured, felt for all these years and yes, they do have souls ... Smiles

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  103. Recently, we went to visit my son at his college campus. They had a placard in front of an old oak tree. It was from the late 1800's. Holy cow! Can you imagine? I mean, I knew the campus had been around for a long time but then, to build it around a sapling and watch it grow. Amazing!!

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  104. I like trees. Maybe I'm not quite as in love with them as you, but I do love looking at them and feel sad when I see one dying. Maybe I'll go out and chat with the elm in our backyard.

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  105. I agree with you completely. Our town is known as " Town of Live Oaks and Friendly Folks". Some streets have trees in the middle and the street splits at the tree.

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  106. I agree with you. Every place I lived that didn't have trees always felt so soulless and bare.

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  107. When my family and I vacationed one year we went to the Redwood Forest and seeing those massive tree's was really something to see. so I can understand why you feel the way you do.

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  108. Hi Keith - trees are quite extraordinary .. in fact nature is .. and we really should let everything run (live) its course ... man doesn't seem to allow that - yet we love our creature comforts ...

    The more I learn the more I want to learn ... and I sat in a Silver Birch tree swaying in the wind for many an hour when I was a littley! Cheers and you'll have trees to share now ... enjoy - Hilary

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  109. What a beautiful perspective Keith. I love trees, but I hadn't really given it so much thought. I love the idea they have souls. :)

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  110. I cannot imagine a world without trees. They offer so much, from shade to fruit and beyond.

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  111. I remember my favorite "Mango Tree" I feel connected with them as well. I think trees are beautiful and love seeing them blooming flowers and fruits everywhere. Great post, Keith:)

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  112. There is a big oak tree in front of our house - that's why our area is called Oakland - and it definitely shelters and guards us from the expansiveness of the outside world

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  113. Hi,
    I love poetry very much!
    I know poems of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow!

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  114. I think that trees have souls and they can feel pain as well.
    This is a beautiful post.
    Thanks for sharing your feelings about trees. I hope that there are more people like you so we can save our forests.

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  115. I am fascinated by trees. I love to look at them. I remember when I was about 10 or so, we had a huge oak tree in our front yard. I heard that "talking" to plants was good for them, so I figured it would be good for trees too. I would go out and talk to that tree all the time lol. The neighbors probably thought I was nuts, but I did love that tree!

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  116. One of the biggest eye opening experiences I've had in this aspect was when I went to the Redwood forest. That is when I realized the story behind every tree, the soul and life.

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  117. I do believe that trees have souls. How fitting that you wrote this post, as a few days ago I starting tearing up when at home they are cutting down trees for land development, The saddest thing I have EVER seen, as these trees are as many as 300 years old.

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  118. I hug them whenever possible!!! :)

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  119. I totally believe this. I am as heartbroken about their destruction as I am about cruelty to animals. There is the one old tree left standing, surrounded by all the condo works behind our home -- I am praying that they at least let him live.

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  120. My relationship with trees? Well, I'm jealous of them. I look at them and think, You were here before I was born and will still be here when I'm on my way to nothingness. It makes me feel humble and, I admit, a tad jealous. So, I'm afraid nothing as deep as your connection with trees.

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  121. What a lovely post Keith. I love trees too. I think there is something magical about being in the presence of trees, particularly very old and large ones. All that time, gracing the land, helping to keep the air clean, providing shade...they are a gift, always.

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  122. I really appreciate the beauty in trees too. We have a lot in yard, covered with ivy. When my daughter was younger she used to love climbing them. She begged us to plant a weeping willow tree so one day she could read a book under it.

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  123. As you know from my tongue-in-cheek post, my tangerine tree loves my mother more than us.

    Seriously though, trees have always called to us. In Thailand where we just returned from... ribbons are tied around old trees that are acknowledged to have souls. I thought it was such a beautiful tradition. In Japan the Shinto religion finds spirits in trees, rivers, nature. We've always tried to tend to our trees with respect and mourn their loss when they die.

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