Tuesday, August 5, 2014

True Heroes...


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Lately I have been following the news about the recent Ebola outbreak that is plaguing West Africa. It is the most deadly Ebola outbreak in history.

The Ebola virus is perhaps the deadliest virus known to man. It has a mortality rate of up to 90%. To this day, virologists still do not know the origin of the virus.

Recently, a pioneering Ebola Dr. fell victim to the virus while working to save Ebola patients. He succumbed to the virus four days after becoming symptomatic. Two other prominent Ebola doctors contracted the virus and are now being treated. Several other healthcare workers have died in this recent outbreak, contracting the virus from the very patients they are trying to save.  
What strikes me about this is how heroic these doctors, nurses, and healthcare workers really are. They are literally risking their lives to help these poor victims, knowing full well that they may contract the virus themselves. The amazing thing is, this does not stop them from helping. 

They are true heroes, in every sense of the word. They are not doing this for notoriety, fame, or money. In fact, most of them are donating their time and are not getting paid a penny. They are truly altruistic souls. 


Have you been following this news of the outbreak? What are your thoughts on these doctors and healthcare workers who are putting their life on the line?

140 comments:

  1. Good Morning,

    I have been following this story and it breaks my heart these doctors and nurses are indeed true hero's who have dedicated their very lives to help others.

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  2. They understand that the greatest gift we can give is ourselves.

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  3. Absolutely. I had exactly the same thought. Heroes indeed.
    Then again, I am always so impressed with healthcare workers. The couple of occasions I've been in hospital everyone has always been so kind and so wonderful, it has brought tears to my eyes!
    It's amazing all the people working over there now, most of whom of course have families, friends and lives - and yet they are risking theirs to help their fellow human beings. Truly admirable.

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  4. I take my hat off to these volunteer doctors for what they are doing. At the same time, there have been confirmed cases of Ebola in South Africa, a mere 4 hours away from where I live. I am seriously concerned...

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  5. I think these people are wonderful to do all that they can to save others even putting themselves into dangers way... very selfless...

    I have a few blogger friends that live over there, not directly where the outbreaks are but scary for them too...

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  6. you know, they are in a profession that realizes if they respond they have a chance to contract it and die...kinda like firemen running into a burning building...i have great respect...

    we know the male doctor that is in atlanta now...he is good friends with one of the doctors on staff at the college my wife works

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  7. I agree. Their behaviour is extremely brave, as are the many in the medical professions who expose themselves to diseases. To get ebola into context though, 900 people have died from the disease this year. Compare that to how many children have starved to death, how many people have been killed in car accidents, how many people have died from easily curable diseases?

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  8. I have been following it. I think any kind of mission trip into these third world countries, Dr.s or otherwise is very brave. Some friends from a church I used to attend were in Haiti a couple of years ago, and they were all in their "hut" at night, getting ready for bed, when they were attacked. Bullets were flying everywhere. They barely made it home. Some were shot, no one died. Every time someone complains about our government here, I tell them they could go live in another country...for five minutes...they'd be back!
    I will say I am concerned that if "suiting up" in Africa did not stop them from getting Ebola, then how is it going to stop it from spreading here. I hope it doesn't.

    Cindy Bee

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  9. yes they are true hero, with no regard to their own health and safety, they step in where most would shy away, where would this world be without them,

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  10. Heroes in every sense of the word. Hopefully they squash the outbreak soon

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  11. I really can't add to what you have said here, Keith.
    These people are heroes in every sense of the word...

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  12. These people are definitely heroes. I am amazed at how they are willing to risk (and give up) their own lives to help others. Truly touches the heart.

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  13. definitely heroes, more power to them, but I don't think others who may have the virus should be risking the lives of others by flying on planes when they know they may be ill as in the person who was just admitted to a hospital in New York

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  14. They are true heroes indeed. Very frightening disease. I hope this epidemic is able to be controlled and that it does not spread elsewhere.

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  15. This disease is very scary! Definitely brave people to work with patients with this disease - and brave again to agree to experimental medication!

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  16. Very true. It's sad to know that we have lost so many amazing people. But just think about all of the true heroes around the world that we are unaware of.

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  17. I am following the news closely. Things like that are always scary because it could happen anywhere as well. I mean, a virus can travel in a plane. Creepy. But yeah, the people who work there are real heroes.

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  18. The word "hero" is often tossed around loosely nowadays. You are correct - - these health care workers are true heroes, risking their own lives to help others who are in dire need.

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  19. Could not have said it better myself. They deserve to be called heroes.

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  20. I have been following this Keith and I couldn't agree more...these are laying down their lives for fellowman. It is very scary to me that it could come here.

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  21. You are right, Keith.Risking your own life to safe another is my definition of a pure hero, for sure.

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  22. They are doubly heroes; many of these healthcare workers are being attacked by a frightened populace when they try to enter villages, etc... to help the people there.
    Ignorance and fear, they cause us to behave in insane ways.
    Thank you for this post Keith.

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  23. They are true heroes and I find it totally enthralling but yet horrifying.

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  24. I've not been following it as closely as you are, but enough to know what's happening. There are heroes in every career. Those that will go the extra mile and they are more rare than those that wouldn't put themselves in harms way. These that are helping these people are indeed heroes.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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  25. they truly are. self-sacrificing and giving souls.

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  26. They are true heroes! My sister-in-law comes from Sierra Leone so we've been following this - too scary!

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  27. Hello Keith,

    This is indeed an awful situation and the health workers who are dealing with the sufferers are indeed both brave and very professional. It all does serve in our minds to raise awareness of the countless hundreds and thousands of health professionals the world over who work, often in poor situations and for little financial reward to tend to the sick and the dying. We all owe them a great debt of gratitude.

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  28. Yes, I saw some of it last night. They have given a mystery experimental drug to two victims here and they have gotten better! But they said that does not prove anything; they could have gotten better anyway. But I think it is working. I feel almost as bad for the poor health care workers who have to tend to them.

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  29. I haven't been following as much as I should. Lately I've been blogging, while the news is on. I try and listen, but then realize I've missed most of it. Reading about it is better than watching a cover story about it. I should just do some reading.

    Things like this are scary! I know it's over and done with, but my mom got Polio 1 year before they came out with a vaccine. She's lucky she never was in a wheel chair, or had to have an iron lung. She did however had to have 2 different sizes of shoes, never could run, and had to have her ankle fuzed. Things that effect massive amounts of people is scary! Especially when they don't know the source.

    I have a family full of nurses: My Grandma was a nurse, my 3 Aunts are nurses, my Mom was a nurse, my sister is a nurse, and 2 of my cousins are nurses. When my sister was pregnant with one of her sons she wasn't told that she was working on a patient that had HIV. That's kind of important information when you are dealing with blood. They certainly are on the line with their own lives sometimes.

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  30. As a nurse, I have asked myself the question
    " how would I cope if we had Ebola on our intensive care unit?"
    I honestly don't know ifi would ...
    Hats off to heal care professionals that can without flinching

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  31. To care for the sick is a great service and certainly not easy. I'm praying for the outbreak to cease.

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  32. i agree - they are going way, way, way beyond their call of duty - they are true souls. so, so grateful for their service.

    i have an issue (maybe even issues is not the right word to use here??!) with the word "hero" - it has become a word that many use & it is used way to often, to the point of way to much, almost like "the", "um", that sort of thing? so i won't use that one. for me - it goes for folks like Mother Theresa or such like that. but even "hero" falls way below what she did. what she gave so gracelessly & without thought or reserve. i guess she was considered a saint only after she past on. just me though. please don't think i am taking away from their service or whatnot, just wish that we humans could use word more wisely or with better thought? (we all can agree to disagree, that is what makes the world go round & round.)

    oh, i see Jane and Lance Hattatt comment above - well said, i totally agree, i love folks who can speak from their heart & are wellspoken. i find it stuff to find the perfect or correct words sometimes. later. ( :

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  33. I have been following this scary story and agree that the volunteers are amazing and selfless people. Bringing the two Americans back for treatment will offer much needed information on this killer virus. Prayers for healing and safety...

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  34. Indeed, they are special people. It makes one feel quite humble to have such skill and devotion available in these tragic circumstances, and as you say, free of charge as well. They deserve a medal. Last I heard, the Ebola doctor was pulling through thankfully.

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  35. No greater love has a man than this, that he lay down his life for a friend (or in this case, other humans).

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  36. they are very selfless and brave.

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  37. This is what makes an excellent doctor. As those who join the military know the hazards of the work, so do the medical workers. A lot of viruses originate in Africa, due to heat, poor sanitation, and so on. The fact that altruism exists gives me hope for the human race.

    Having to deal with western world hospitals, not the private expensive ones, has shown me that the mantra of succoring the sick and the ailing has dropped by the wayside. I read today in our news that Canadian companies have helped develop two of the three antibodies that are currently being merged into a vaccine to test on the virus. This is what the USA used to do, like the comic book heroes. Try to save the day. Bravo for the doctors braving these odds. Didn't Madame Curie die in her studies of radiation? Didn't that help an enormous number of people?
    An excellent and thoughtful take on the situation, OE, thank you.

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  38. I am thankful for people like them.
    They are selfless and true heroes ....

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  39. They are amazing, selfless people, and I was horrified by the number of people who protested bringing the 2 American victims back to the US for treatment. The virus is far more likely to arrive in our country by a world-traveler showing no symptoms than 2 people under strict quarantine. My heart goes out to these doctors and their families.

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  40. Reading this post made me think of Roland Yoemans post a few days ago on Ebola. Do you read his blog?

    If not... http://rolandyeomans.blogspot.com/2014/08/what-are-they-not-telling-us-about-ebola.html

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  41. Well I have a little different spin on things as I live here in Atlanta and not far from Emory. I feel these people are WONDERFUL and I am sorry for the WONDERFUL DOCS - but if one person slips up in one small way - we are all here in Atlanta at risk. I just wonder if that was the best option. Why didn't we go there to help them. Just a different perspective here - I really do have mixed feelings.

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  42. i have been following as well and i agree.. they are truly heroes.

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  43. I do watch the News almost every day and I don't think I would be as brave as the healthcare workers are. It is a scary situation.

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  44. True heroes for sure. I don't watch as much news as I used to, because I have issues with anxiety, but I have been keeping track of the sad developments in Africa. I'm so grateful for people like these healthcare workers who help others at great risk to themselves. So very grateful...

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  45. They are what I would hope to be...truly inspirational!

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  46. To risk your life to save another... true heroes indeed.

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  47. Yes, I follow and I am IN AWE of their desire to do such brave things for humanity. I feel as timid as a mouse by comparison.

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  48. Hi Keith .. I'm sure I've read today somewhere that a reversal drug is being tested and seems to be working ... can't quite find the article now - as I didn't expect to write about it!

    Also it doesn't appear to be as dangerous as everyone is panicking about, yet obviously the lack of knowledge doesn't help ... but I agree to make the decision to go and help would be a difficult one - but many health workers are just brilliant individuals ..

    Cheers Hilary

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  49. more courage than is humanely possible that is unimaginable. I pray...
    and will continue every morning, when i do my praying

    ps not that it's important but blogger stopped posting my photos so i deleted my blog and all photos on googles, I'm now at:http://outofsightl.blogspot.ca/
    mostly a writing blog in fact if you were to read today....you migh get something out of it...although that sounds so stupid to me, but maybe you will.....I write about the good ones.....

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  50. Of course I have because I live in the metro-Atlanta area and everyone is making jokes about The Walking Dead and such. I'm not worried about it becoming a problem in the US. I just wish we could all focus more on healing than on war. If the money spent on the conflict in Gaza could be reallocated to what is needed in Africa, imagine how much nicer things would be for everyone . . .

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  51. In all honesty I haven't been following the news because I have been dealing with health issues of my own, as you know. Thanks for sharing this, Keith!

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  52. It is self-sacrificial work they are doing...brings tears to my eyes.

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  53. I don't have a TV, nor do I use radio. Usually If the news is bad, I'll hear it from others. I was not aware of what is happening in W. Africa. My prayers go out to both the suffering and serving.

    I am grateful for the example of caring, courageous and dedicated medical workers, and humbled. I don't think I could deliberately put my life on the line like them. I have other work that I am called to do. I put myself on the line in other ways---emotionally, spiritually and mentally---daily, but not my life.

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  54. I have been following this news, the courage and selflessness caring of these people is overwhelming.

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  55. Heroes indeed. Following in the footsteps of many before them. Leprosy leaps to mind.
    When I despair about people (often) I don't have to look far at all to see the flip side (epitomised by people like these).

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  56. I totally applauded these people. Putting their life on the line to help others. Knowing what could and did happen to them.
    I find them true unsung heroes.
    And the doctors treating them here in the USA!
    Cheri

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  57. They rank right up there with the initial AIDS care givers when contagion was not understood.
    I am always impressed with doctors and nurses who jump in to care for the really ill with out personal concern. They see a need and just do it. True heroes.

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  58. I've been following it, but didn't hear that the dr succumbed. They are true heroes.

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  59. Being the news junkie that I am, I have been following the Ebola news avidly.

    Those nursers - doctors - and of course countless volunteers are brave, selfless, and indeed, heroic. No other words for it.

    To risk one's life to save another, whether it be human or animal is beyond admirable. Sadly, it is a distinguishing quality that very few of us have - if we are honest.

    May they find a cure. And soon.

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  60. They are the unsung heroes and should be applauded not the sports people or entertainment people who cry if they get a hang nail. from what I heard, the Dr and the nurse that came back have been given a drug to counteract the Ebola Virus and it seems to be working although it is in the testing stage. i am proud to say it was developed in Canada-Winnipeg. let's hope this drug proves to be the key to destroy this virus as this, I fear will spread.

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  61. Very brave men and women. Thank God there are people like them.

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  62. Keith I've been following it very closely, and simply put, I am in total awe of these selfless men and women. How the world could learn lesson from them. All in one breath these "heroes" both sadden and uplift me. I have tried to imagine the pride and worry that their families and friends must feel and I fall short.

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  63. I've been following it. It scares the beejeezus out of me. Ebola scares me. It's scary to think a deadly virus could originate potentially anywhere. The men and women fighting against it today are brave beyond words.

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  64. I have been following the story and you are so right; these are true heroes for the work they are doing! Makes you want kids to emulate them rather than some sport players that kids want to look up to.

    betty

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  65. I've been following this since it started earlier this year and I'm so glad that it's finally getting more press so that there are more resources to help get this under control. I'm in awe of the healthcare workers that put their own health and safety on the line to serve these people. Like you said, they are true heroes, and they inspire me. I think I'm one of the few who is happy that the doctor and the aid worker who have ebola were brought back to the States. I'd be more concerned about people who traveled to West Africa and returned without symptoms but later came down with it than these two. But I'm also of the thought that it's inevitable for these diseases to start traveling, with people moving around between different countries and continents so freely now. Anyway, all of the healthcare workers who helped people in West Africa during this outbreak and the workers that are still there amaze me.

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  66. Yes, I have kept up on it and this is such a tragedy. So many dying--men, women, children. The doctors, nurses and volunteers who know the danger yet give their time and energy are absolutely heroes. I cannot say that I could be so brave. This is selfless love and commitment. I pray for them and all those who they are attempting to help.

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  67. Their incredible generosity is astonishing. Such good can come from human beings.

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  68. Dealing with a bunch of greedy bastard doctors here in the U.S. lately, I have had a sour taste in my mouth when it comes to the medical community. These are the doctors I wish all others would emulate. Selfless beings who stood up to do what was right, not what would line their pockets, are definitely true heroes!

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  69. I felt the same too. How heroic..true humans!!! Who care to help others!

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  70. Yes, I have been following it. So tragic. These doctors and nurses are wonderful human beings, so brave and selfless. I feel so sad for them.

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  71. The Finnish Red Cross was just looking for volunteer nurses the other day to go to the Ebola area. Too bad I'm only beginning nursing school!

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  72. Real heroes they're .... sacrificing their well being, tramping over their fears, they are helping out the needies ... Kudos to them ...

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  73. We use the term hero too often these days - especially for people who play sport - these doctors really deserve that accolade.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    PS: Im not normally a fan of pictures of myself, but I rather like the tern hat one!

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  74. It truly amazes me that they are willing to risk their lives! I'm trying not to follow it too closely, but my hubby is and informs of everything :)

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  75. Knowing that people like them still exist gives me hope.

    Have a beautiful day Keith!

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  76. I always think health care workers are amazing. The disease is very, very scary.

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  77. Hi Keith!:) I too have been following this tragic story, and I think all the medical health workers who risk their own lives to save others are indeed heros. The humanized antibodies in the new drug seem to be working on the two Americans. It's early days but it would be a great break through if this discovery meant an early cure.

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  78. In this day and age of truly horrific events, it gives me hope for the human race. These heroes/heroines have proved that mankind isn't completely full of self-serving A-Holes.

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  79. I'm also disturbed that there have been pandemics thorughout world history which have killed millions of people, even as recently as less than 100 years ago.
    Oh...my.

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  80. yes, the Wise ones, I've re-opened a photo blog, but am keeping my writing blog..my new photos blog is ; http://forevermyphotosl.blogspot.ca/
    Thank you Keith for caring so much, to me you are also part of the wise ones, i see it in everything you write, in everything you share, I'm grateful for knowing you

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  81. Thank you for posting this, Keith. Yes, I have been following the story and find it deeply upsetting on some levels (in reading that people suspected of being health care professionals there have been attacked out of fear) and greatly inspiring in others. Such is our human condition...

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  82. I have been hearing about the outbreak and remembering that moving ages ago, Outbreak, all about the exact same thing. My dad was a doctor, and one of the things he wanted to do was go give of his time and energy in volunteer situations like this. Unfortunately he didn't live long enough to fulfill that dream, but I recognize these people's hero spirit from what I saw in my dad. True heroes indeed!

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  83. I agree Keith, they are heroes indeed. I've seen this news on TV.

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  84. Ebola is deadly. They are struggling to contain it in Africa. What I feel is rest of the world is not giving adequate support to them. If it spreads to other parts of the world then it is disaster, no doubt about it !
    Thanks Keith for this post :)

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  85. The doctors and health workers, who are treating the people with Ebola and are in turn putting themselves at risk, are heroes. This is a great post, Keith!

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  86. I agree with you Keith-these doctors are heroes who serve others for no rewards

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  87. I so admire the people on the front lines giving direct care to patients, willing to put their lives at risk to help others. That, to me, is the highest level of Love. And I am thankful to those working in public health trying to stem the spread and find treatments.

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  88. Personally, I'm grateful for all the hard-working medical providers all over the world who sacrifice so much by working with the poor and this includes those here in the States who spend their days helping people who are denied medical care in spite of ACA. For the most part, they go unrecognized because few people care about them or the poor.

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  89. I say "here here" for the doctors who are true to their calling. It is a refreshing piece of good news. Thank you.

    Helen

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  90. They are heroic. I hope that the experimental drug they're trying is successful.

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  91. You're right. They are true heroes. Thanks for this beautiful post.

    Greetings from London.

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  92. The news horrifies me so I keep my head in the sand. I've had enough news for a lifetime already.

    They are indeed heroes. We have groups of local doctors, nurses, dentists, and just plain citizens that go each year to help other countries. I am proud.

    I've often wondered if they check here first.

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  93. The news is constant about this disease and it really scary.. I agree these doctors and healthcare are all heroes! I hope they can find a cure! Thanks, Keith!

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  94. True heroes and very brave human beings.

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  95. They are God's angels hard at work. Lovely post, Keith...

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  96. They are amazing people, Keith. I've never heard of this virus before. Sometimes I wonder where these terrible virus' come from. The doctors that help these patients are special, indeed.

    ~Sheri

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  97. Honestly, Keith, this amount of both suffering and heroism is so far removed from my daily experience I'm humbled into speechlessness ...

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  98. They truly are heroes. The spread of this disease is very scary.

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  99. Such selfless human beings! Healthcare workers are admirable brave souls! They do what they know and love, not thinking of themselves, but saving lives, looking out for the welfare of others. Truly incredible work.

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  100. I am in awe of them. These are some of the most evolved souls on the planet: totally and utterly selfless. The true heroes of this world.

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  101. Yes, I am following these stories of selfless, brave and dedicated health care providers, and praying for their full recovery....and a cure! Great question.

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  102. they have killed my photo blog again so i guess i'll post my photos on google I'll visit people on googles and a few that I'm keeping on blogger i still have the writing one, for what that matter anyway also keeping you on my visitors'slist

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  103. Absolutely true. Whenever I see them on the news channel, I am in awe of them and their work.

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  104. I admire them very much ~ Thanks Keith for featuring them ~

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  105. I actually can't wrap my mind around that. They are risking their lives to treat patients that have a virus with a 90% mortality rate. The odds of them catching the virus are very very high. Yet they still help without thinking about it. Just imagine only 20 % of people in this world would be that selfless. I think it would change the world. I'm getting goosebumps thinking about what they do for others because to be painfully honest, I do not know if I could do it, I'd be scared to my core. My respect for those people is deeper than I could ever put in words. Thank you to all those people that help others first. You are the true heroes in this world. Thank you for this post, honey.

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  106. Wow. I haven't been following the story. You said it all. I've nothing to add, but I'm deeply touched.

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  107. Im agree! Really heroes and someones are die were doctors too!
    Today I heard a spanish priest and a nun are sick too.they are in Spain now in a hospital.
    Really impressive because I see first in tv how he was caring people and now sick.
    Did you see the movie "the mission" is old but an amazing movie about jesuitas in america.
    Nice post Keith.

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  108. I could never do what these people do. I'd much rather be the guy paying for people to do these things so I don't have to.

    I guess I'm a bit of a coward.

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  109. Undoubtedly Bro! There service can’t be compared with anything… they die while preventing others from death. Who can do this? Only those understand the preciousness of life, could rise down to the level of death.

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  110. It is so heartbreaking. You have said it well - they are truly altruistic souls. I do believe they are angels in human form. What else could they be? xo Karen

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  111. I could not agree with you more and I hope something can be done to treat/cure these people fast.

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  112. fyi i was able to post a poem and a photo on my photoblog maybe they'll allow me one a week ?????

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  113. One of the doctors is being treated in Atlanta, where I live. I'm curious as to how he's doing. These people are really altruistic souls. I'm not sure I would put myself in their position and risk my life for people I don't even know.

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  114. Yes, I too have been following the virus news. The selflessness of those helping care for those ill is profound . . .

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  115. These people who have been trying to help are really doing such a selfless act.

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  116. They are fantastic, the devotion and all. I cannot think of a more greater sacrifice risking their lives knowing fully well the imminent danger. I just thought it was such a great loss for such experts to be put to risk where we will run out of such eminent expertise in no time. Great thoughts Keith!

    Hank

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  117. Yes they are the true heroes , thank you for sharing :)

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  118. It's the most horrible disease I've ever heard of. How awful it must be to melt from the inside. It takes a lot of courage to help these people, knowing that you might get infected as well.

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  119. I bow infront of their sense of duty. The Ebola virus has reached India. A man in Chennai, Tamilnadu has contracted the disease...

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  120. I haven't really been following the news about it, but I did see where a Tennessee doctor came back from over there and sequestered himself in his house to keep from spreading it to others if he does have it. I thought that was really big of him.

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  121. I totally agree. These people are heroes. Sure hope this outbreak is brought under control soon.

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  122. Knowing what these doctors have done and how selfless they are is quite humbling and a reminder to be a better person myself.

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  123. They really are putting their lives on the line. I admire and applaud them for it. Hoping their efforts to find a cure are successful soon.

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  124. Yes, they are truly heroes ... usually unsung even when they fall prey to the disease they are fighting. Did you know one doctor got Ebola even though he was wearing a Hazmet Suit? That is one scary disease.

    Did you know that the CDC has had THREE MAJOR accidents with viral samples within the last month? Anthrax leaking through the air vents into hallways. Vials of active Bird Flu sent mistakenly to the wrong address. And six vials of live Smallpox bacteria ABANDONED and LEFT.

    I do not have much trust in government facilities these days. Sigh.

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  125. How incredibly beautiful that they are willing to go to such risks to help others. And heartbreaking when they too become ill.

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  126. I agree.....selfless service...these people make the world a beautiful place to live in..I pray we find a cure soon..

    and thanks for the wonderful comment on my blog while I was away :-)

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  127. One of the reasons I donate what I can to Medecin sans Fontieres. I take my hat off to those dedicated medical teams who work in all the world's dangerous trouble spots when they're permitted to.

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  128. I agree that they are true heroes. My heart goes out to those who lost their lives to this horrific virus.

    Julie

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  129. They and others of their ilk are true, selfless heroes. So often their bravery is overlooked.

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  130. I definitely think all those medical people are true heroes. My son just graduated from Johns Hopkins as an international epidemiologist. He's not a doctor, but a public health worker. I really hate to think of him going out to other countries to work on diseases like Ebola. It really, really scares me.

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  131. fyi opened new photo blog + writing one: http://myphotosandstuffl.blogspot.ca/

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  132. I agree, these medical workers are truly heroes,

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  133. Very brave and selfless, heroes indeed.

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